Heat-Treated Glass

Heat-treated glass is available in two different options: Heat-strengthened or tempered—sometimes referred to as fully tempered. The application, in accordance with the building code requirements, will dictate the type of heat-treated product that should be specified. GGI utilizes state-of-the-art technology to produce quality heat-treated glass in a variety of glass types—for commercial and residential applications.

Information & Samples

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Heat-Strengthened Glass

Heat-strengthened glass is produced with surface and edge compression levels less than fully tempered glass, as specified by ASTM C 1048. The lower compression levels yield a product that is generally twice as strong as annealed glass of the same thickness, size, and type.

ASTM C 1048 requires that heat-strengthened glass have a surface compression level between 3,500 pounds per square inch (psi) to 7,500 psi (24 to 52 MPa). The break pattern of heat-strengthened glass is relatively large. The glass pieces typically remain engaged in the glazing pocket, decreasing the probability of fall out.

Heat-strengthened glass does not meet the safety glazing requirements for use in hazardous locations.

FEATURES & BENEFITS

  • Meets industry standard specification requirements ASTM C 1048
  • Break pattern like annealed glass, yet two times stronger
  • For use in non-safety glazing applications subjected to wind loads and thermal stresses
  • Maximum recommended sizes are subject to the glass thickness and configurations specified

APPLICATIONS

  • Curtain Walls
  • Insulating Glass Units
  • Laminated Glass
  • Windows

Fully Tempered Glass

Fully tempered glass is required in ASTM C 1048 to have either a minimum surface compression of 10,000 psi (69 MPa) or an edge compression of not less than 9,700 psi (67 MPa) or meet ANSI Z 97.1 or CPSC 16 CFR 1201. The higher compression levels yield a product that is generally four times stronger than annealed glass and twice as strong as heat-strengthened glass of the same thickness, size, and type.

Upon impact, fully tempered glass shatters into relatively small fragments significantly reducing the likelihood of serious injuries as with ordinary annealed glass. To qualify as a safety glazing material as defined by ANSI Z97.1 and CPSC 16 CFR 1201, the ten largest particles taken from a broken fully tempered lite of glass shall weigh no more than the equivalent weight of 10 square inches (64 cm²) of the original specimen when tested according to the standards.

FEATURES & BENEFITS

  • Meets the safety glazing requirements for fully tempered glass ANSI Z 97.1 or CPSC 16 CFR 1201
  • Break pattern results in small fragments
  • Four times stronger than annealed glass
  • Tested and approved by the Safety Glazing Certification Council (SGCC)
  • For use in safety glazing applications subjected to mechanical and thermal stresses
  • Maximum recommended sizes are subject to the glass thickness and configurations specified.

APPLICATIONS

  • All-Glass Entrances
  • Curtain Walls
  • Doors
  • Glass Handrails
  • Insulating Glass Units
  • Laminated Glass
  • Partitions
  • Point-Supported Glass Wall Systems
  • Storefronts
  • Shower Enclosures
  • Windows

It is important to note that the original flatness of glass is slightly modified by the heat-treating process causing reflected images to be distorted. Bow, warp, roll distortion and strain pattern are inherent characteristics of heat-treated glass. While fabricators take steps to minimize these conditions, they cannot be eliminated. Consult ASTM C 1048 for additional information.Fully tempered glass is required in ASTM C 1048 to have either a minimum surface compression of 10,000 psi (69 MPa) or an edge compression of not less than 9,700 psi (67 MPa) or meet ANSI Z 97.1 or CPSC 16 CFR 1201. The higher compression levels yield a product that is generally four times stronger than annealed glass and twice as strong as heat-strengthened glass of the same thickness, size, and type.

Heat-strengthened and fully tempered glass cannot be cut, drilled, or edged following the heat-treated process. Sandblasting, etching, or v-grooving should be executed before the heat-treating process. In addition, some rolled, patterned glass cannot be heat-treated.

 

GGI is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council in support of sustainable building design and environmentally friendly manufacturing processes.

 

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